Call for Submissions: Terralingua Langscape

Ganga Aarti ceremony in Rishikesh, India. photo: Jamie Alissa Beck. From her article A Biocultural Approach to Developement. http://www.terralingua.org/bcdconservation/?p=1493

Langscape Volume 2, Issue 12

 

Biocultural Diversity: An Emerging Paradigm in a Changing World
Biocultural approaches to conservation, development and education

With Guest Editor: Felipe Montoya Greenheck

In this upcoming issue of Langscape, we hope to bring together some of the voices calling for transformation of the status quo of the way we live on this planet.  The dominant economic paradigm is in crisis, undermined by its own ecological and social unsustainability. Some of the viable alternatives to this destructive system are coming precisely from the multicolored tapestry of diverse peoples who inhabit diverse spaces around the world, and who for the most part have been victims of this dominant paradigm. We believe that vital lessons for the future of life on earth lie in the perspectives, stories and practices of the world’s diverse peoples. We hope to weave together, amplify and honor the voices that arise from this biocultural tapestry. By giving a forum to these voices, we hope to shed light on the promise of biocultural diversity, spark dialogue, and help present the proposals for positive change in this deeply interconnected and increasingly fragile world.  To do this, we are calling on those of you who are speaking a new biocultural language. Whether you work to integrate the conservation of biological and cultural resources, or to devise and implement new biocultural paths to economic and social development, or to foster biocultural approaches to education and learning—or if you wish to share any other theoretical, methodological and practical ways to achieve a better world in which our biocultural diversity can thrive—we would like to hear from you!

  • Expressions of interest -  June 15, 2013
  • Full contributions  -  July 30, 2013

Please submit your expression of interest – your idea in one or two paragraphs – by June 15 so that we can solicit full contributions as soon as possible. We aim to have all full contributions in by the July 30.  Please send your inquiries and submissions directly to the Langscape Editor, Ortixia Dilts: ortixia@terralingua.org. If you wish, you can send a cc to our Guest Editor, Felipe Montoya Greenheck, as well: milpa99@gmail.com.

We are looking for interviews, articles, case studies, stories, poetry, expressions of art and photographs. Text should be a maximum of 1500 words (excluding references) in a MS Word doc format. Please submit photographs and illustrations, separately, in a 300dpi .jpg format. You can download the Langscape Contributors Guidelines here:  Langscape Contibutors Guidlines

In this upcoming issue of Langscape, we hope to bring together some of the voices calling for transformation of the status quo of the way we live on this planet.  The dominant economic paradigm is in crisis, undermined by its own ecological and social unsustainability. Some of the viable alternatives to this destructive system are coming precisely from the multicolored tapestry of diverse peoples who inhabit diverse spaces around the world, and who for the most part have been victims of this dominant paradigm. We believe that vital lessons for the future of life on earth lie in the perspectives, stories and practices of the world’s diverse peoples. We hope to weave together, amplify and honor the voices that arise from this biocultural tapestry. By giving a forum to these voices, we hope to shed light on the promise of biocultural diversity, spark dialogue, and help present the proposals for positive change in this deeply interconnected and increasingly fragile world.  To do this, we are calling on those of you who are speaking a new biocultural language. Whether you work to integrate the conservation of biological and cultural resources, or to devise and implement new biocultural paths to economic and social development, or to foster biocultural approaches to education and learning—or if you wish to share any other theoretical, methodological and practical ways to achieve a better world in which our biocultural diversity can thrive—we would like to hear from you!

Thank you all. We are both very excited about this issue. We look forward to receiving your expressions of interest, as it is your unique contributions that make Langscape the special and delightful read it has become. With warm regards,

Felipe and Ortixia

About the Guest Editor: Born in Costa Rica, Felipe Montoya-Greenheck has lived in Colombia, Honduras, Ecuador, Italy, Spain, Kenya and the United States. He has a B.S. and M.Sc. in biology and a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology. On leave as full professor from the School of Anthropology at the University of Costa Rica, Felipe is currently Director of the Las Nubes Project at the Faculty of Environmental Studies of York University, in Toronto, Canada. The Las Nubes Project works to promote research, education and community engagement in consolidating the Alexander Skutch Biological Corridor in southern Costa Rica.  Felipe´s academic interests include community-based environmental conservation, restoration and recovery of the “commons,” community well being, and the transformative potential of the stories we share locally and globally.  He plays flamenco guitar, is married and has two children. An interview with Felipe can be found on our Biocultural Diversity Conservation Portal at: http://www.terralingua.org/bcdconservation/?p=1444.

Langscape is an extension of the voice of Terralingua. It supports our mission by educating the minds and hearts about the importance and value of biocultural diversity. We aim to promote a paradigm shift by illustrating biocultural diversity through scientific and traditional knowledge, within an elegant sensory context of articles, stories and art.

 

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